KATANA in KOSHIRAE

NOSHU KANENAGA

TENMON 1532

MINO / KOTO

CHUSAKU

NTHK KANTEISHO

SUGATA: SHINOGI ZUKURI

MEI: KANE
NAGA SAKU

DATE: NONE

NAGASA: 66.35cm (26.125")

OVERALL: 84.45cm (33.25")

MIHABA: 3.17cm (1.25")

KASANE: 0.63cm (0.25")

SORI: 1.27cm (0.5")

NAKAGO: UBU / KIRI

MEKUGI ANA: ONE

YASURIME: YOKOYASURI

MUNE: IORI

HADA: ITAME / KO-MOKUME

HAMON: KO-NOTARE

BOSHI: MIDARE KOMI

HORIMONO OMOTE: NONE

HORIMONO URA: NONE

HABAKI: ONE PIECE SOLID SILVER

KOSHIRAE

KATANA

NOSHU KANENAGA C.1532

 

This is a Koto period, Mino Province Katana signed and attributed per the NTHK to the Mino Swordsmith Kanenaga.  Kanenaga was the son of Mino Kanemitsu.  Mino Kanenaga's works were rated "Chusaku" by Fujishiro for their quality.  The polish is a little subdued, but the blade is in overall satisfactory condition, and most everything can still be seen. The polish in the boshi is dull, though in hand the hamon is clearly present, and if not papers would not have been issued, however it was near impossible for me to capture it in the photos.  There are numerous small areas of light scuffs, hike kizu or surface scratches, kitte ware, stains, etc., but nothing at all serious or much less  fatal. This Katana has a nagasa of 26.125" and an overall length of 33.25".  The nakago is ubu with one mekugi ana and has a nice dark patina as one would expect on a 500 year old Koto period sword.  The Ji-hada is Itame with Ko-mokume with chikei.  The Hamon is ko-gunome in nioi.

MINO TO
美濃刀

Mino no kuni 美濃国 or Mino Provence, was located in what is modern day Gifu Prefecture, in the Tosando region of Honshu. Mino Provence bordered Echizen, Hida, Ise, Mikawa, Ōmi, Owari, and Shinano Provinces.

Mino along with Bizen, Yamato, Soshu and Yamashiro made up the “Gokaden” or five main schools of sword production. Documents confirm sword smith’s in Mino Provence as far back as the Hoen era (1156-1159), yet few if any works from this period are extant today. The oldest confirmed swords from Mino are the works of Kaneuji and Kinju, which date to the end of the Kamakura period (1185-1333). Their works show a strong Soshu influence which reflects their beginnings. During this time, Mino den was in the developmental stages and only the works of swordsmith’s who followed Kaneuji and Kinju are generally referred to as Mino Den. The Mino Den reached it’s pinnacle of production late in the Muromachi period (1392-1573), making Mino Den the last of the Gokaden established.

Mino swords produced in the late Muromachi period or “Sue-Seki” blades, were well known due to the sheer numbers produced. Production of such large numbers of swords was directly related to this being the time of the Sengoku or warring Period. It is estimated to have been 800 - 1000 swordsmith’s working in Mino during the 1500’s.
Being a time of war, new forging methods were developed with an emphasis on functional ability opposed to aesthetics. From their beginning Mino swords were famous for their sharpness.

The sugata of swords produced in Mino changed over time, but by late Muromachi the Mino tradition was established.
 

 

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