NEW

OLD

 

 

 

 

TANTO

MUTSU no KAMI DAIDO

KAJIHARA PAPERS

 

SUGATA: HIRA ZUKURI

MEI:  MUMEI

DATE: NONE

NAGASA: 29.52cm (11.625")

OVERALL: 39.84cm (15.687")

MIHABA: 2.54cm (1.")

KASANE: 0.635cm (0.25")

SORI:  0.476cm (0.1875")

NAKAGO: UBU

MEKUGI ANA: TWO

YASURIME: SUJIKAI

MUNE: IORI

HADA: MOKUME

HAMON: MIDARE

BOSHI: KO-MARU

HORIMONO OMOTE: NONE

HORIMONO URA: NONE

HABAKI: TWO PIECE
COPPER

SHIRASAYA X 2

 

The Shodai Daido originally signed Noshu Seki Ju Kanemichi and worked in the Mino Tradition c. 1558. He was said to have been the 9th generation grandson of Shizu Saburo Kaneuji. 

Mino no kuni 美濃国 or Mino Provence, was located in what is modern day Gifu Prefecture, in the Tosando region of Honshu. Mino Provence bordered Echizen, Hida, Ise, Mikawa, Ōmi, Owari, and Shinano Provinces.  Mino along with Bizen, Yamato, Soshu and Yamashiro made up the “Gokaden” or five main schools of sword production. Documents confirm sword smith’s in Mino Provence as far back as the Hoen era (1156-1159), yet few if any works from this period are extant today. The oldest confirmed swords from Mino are the works of Kaneuji and Kinju, which date to the end of the Kamakura period (1185-1333). Their works show a strong Soshu influence which reflects their beginnings. During this time, Mino den was in the developmental stages and only the works of swordsmith’s who followed Kaneuji and Kinju are generally referred to as Mino Den.  The Mino Den reached it’s pinnacle of production late in the Muromachi period (1392-1573), making Mino Den the last of the Gokaden to be established.

Mino swords produced in the late Muromachi period or “Sue-Seki” blades, were well known due to the sheer numbers produced. Production of such large numbers of swords was directly related to this being the time of the Sengoku or warring Period. It is estimated to have been 800 - 1000 sword smith’s working in Mino during the 1500’s.
Being a time of war, new forging methods were developed with an emphasis on functional ability opposed to aesthetics. From their beginning Mino swords were famous for their sharpness.

The reference dates vary slightly as is the case with many smiths, yet Kanemichi was said to have received the title of "Mutsu no Kami" around 1570 or near the end of the Koto period.  It was at this time he changed his name to Daido.  It is also written that Daido was a retainer of Nobunaga and that he and his sons Iga no Kami Kanemichi, Tanba no Kami Yoshimichi, Rai Kinmichi, and Etchu no Kami Masatoshi relocated to Kyoto in order to make swords for Nobunaga.  They  became the Kyoto Gokaji, or the Five Swordsmiths of Kyoto.

While Daido did transition into the beginning of the Shinto period, this particular tanto is attributed to the Koto period, more specifically Momoyama, and presents a quite stunning presentation. The sakizori sori clearly points to Momoyama yet reminds one of Nambokucho works. The boshi is ko-maru with a very long kaeri. Within the midare gunome hamon is a multitude of activity including inazuma, sunagashi, ashi and yo. The jigane is mokume with itame and is simply gorgeous, I literally did not want to stop taking photos of it. The nakago is ubu with two mekugi ana. It is overall great condition with a couple of tiny areas of pitting or loose grain, along with a few minor surface scratches. The polish is very good and is done in sashikomi which really makes this blade pop in hand.

The Tanto comes with papers issued by Kotoken Kojihara, a sword polisher held in high regard. When John Yumoto was alive he used Kajihara for both polishing and papers. The sword also comes in shirasaya.  The old shirasaya was pretty worn so the owner opted to have a new one made. The old shirasaya comes along as well.
 


 

SOLD

 

PURCHASE / INQUIRIES