WAKIZASHI with KOSHIRAE

ECHIZEN SEKI

SHINTO PERIOD,  MID EDO

NTHK

 

SUGATA: SHINOGI ZUKURI

MEI: MUMEI

DATE: NONE

NAGASA: 46.99cm (18.5")

OVERALL: 58.57cm (23.0625")

MIHABA: 2.69cm (1.0625")

KASANE: 0.476cm (0.1875")

SORI: 0.95cm (0.375")

NAKAGO: O-SURIAGE

MEKUGI ANA: TWO

YASURIME: SUJIKAI

MUNE: IORI

HADA: ITAME

HAMON: GUNOME

BOSHI: KO-MARU

HORIMONO OMOTE: NONE

HORIMONO URA: NONE

HABAKI: ONE PIECE COPPER

SHIRASAYA / KOSHIRAE

 

WAKIZASHI with KOSHIRAE

ECHIZEN SEKI

SHINTO PERIOD, MID EDO

NTHK

Offered on consignment is a wakizashi attributed to Echizen Seki by the NTHK.  During the Koto period there were no swordsmith's working in  Echizen province other than Chiyozuru Kuniyasu and his school.  During the Shinto period around 1624 after being conquered by Oda Nobunaga, a castle and ensuing town was built in Echizen.  This of course stimulated growth and prosperity, leading to the demand for swords.  Smith's from many areas relocated to Echizen province, and there were several well known smiths from this area, such as Yamashiro Kunkiyo and Horikawa Kunihiro along with others. The two major schools in the area were the Yasutsugu and Echizen Seki schools.  The Echizen Seki school consisted of smiths from Mino province.  Works vary reflecting both the Shinto Tokuden as well as the Mino traditions. Some of the Echizen Seki smiths include Kanetane, Kanenori, Kanemasa, Kanetoshi, Kanetaka, Tsuguhiro, Hirotaka, Yoshitane.

This particular sword though being o-suriage still retains a nice sugata. The Hada is Itame with chikei and ji-nie. The hamon is Gunome and basically nioi, but with clouds of nie, ara nie sprinkled along in both the hamon and hada.  Sunagashi and inazuma are seen as well.  The Boshi is Ko-maru  with hakikake. There are a couple of tiny, tiny pits, a few hike kizu or light surface scratches, but there are no fatal flaws as evidenced by the sword receiving papers from the NTHK. As with most swords with light scratches or any areas of course hada, the light reflects off these making them look worse than they are.  In hand this sword looks ten times better than I can depict in the photos.  Any one who has purchased swords from me can attest that they always look better in hand, no matter how nice you think they look in the photos.

This sword comes in shirasaya, but also with koshirae.  The Koshirae is very nice.  The string wrap was well done and always adds a look of elegance to the overall appearance of any sword. The menuki are dragons and I believe are brass. The F/K depict tigers.  I don't think they are an original pair as the work on the fuchi looks inferior to the kashira, but even so, they match up quite well.  The carving on the kashira is very well done and really makes this koshirae stand out. The Tsuba is iron. The koiguchi, kurigata and uragawara are horn. The kozuka and kogai are wooden tsunagi. The saya is ribbed lacquer.

Again, the sword comes with both shirasaya and koshirae, as well as papers from the NTHK.

 

SOLD

 

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