WAKIZASHI IN KOSHIRAE

SUGATA: SHINOGI ZUKURI

MEI: MUMEI

DATE: NONE

NAGASA: 51.22cm (20.166")

OVERALL: 64.29cm (25.31")

MIHABA: 2.69cm (1.0625")

KASANE: 0.476cm (0.1875")

SORI: 1.43cm (0.5625")

NAKAGO: UBU

MEKUGI ANA: ONE

YASURIME: KIRI

MUNE: IORI

HADA: ITAME

HAMON: MIDARE GUNOME

BOSHI: MIDARE KOMI WITH KAERI KATAI

HABAKI: TWO PIECE SILVER FOIL

WAKIZASHI IN KOSHIRAE

Offered here is a nice wakiazashi in koshirae.  While not papered I think it is safe to say this is shinto Mino work. 

Mino no kuni 美濃国 or Mino Provence, was located in what is modern day Gifu Prefecture, in the Tosando region of Honshu. Mino Provence bordered Echizen, Hida, Ise, Mikawa, Ōmi, Owari, and Shinano Provinces.  Mino along with Bizen, Yamato, Soshu and Yamashiro made up the “Gokaden” or five main schools of sword production. Documents confirm sword smith’s in Mino Provence as far back as the Hoen era (1156-1159), yet few if any works from this period are extant today. The oldest confirmed swords from Mino are the works of Kaneuji and Kinju, which date to the end of the Kamakura period (1185-1333). Their works show a strong Soshu influence which reflects their beginnings. During this time, Mino den was in the developmental stages and only the works of swordsmith’s who followed Kaneuji and Kinju are generally referred to as Mino Den.  The Mino Den reached it’s pinnacle of production late in the Muromachi period (1392-1573), making Mino Den the last of the Gokaden to be established.

Mino swords were well known due to the sheer numbers produced. Production of such large numbers of swords was directly related to the Sengoku or warring Period. It is estimated to have been 800 - 1000 sword smith’s working in Mino during the 1500’s alone.  Being a time of war, new forging methods were developed with an emphasis on functional ability opposed to aesthetics. From their beginning Mino swords were famous for their sharpness.

This wakizashi presents well and has a very nice hamon of gunome midare which extends into the boshi. and the hada is itame. The nakago is ubu with one mekugi ana.

The koshirae is in good condition, though the saya appears to have been restored somewhat.  The fuchi is shakudo and of a wave pattern, the kashira is horn.  The menuki are a type of bird or fowl.  The Tsuba has a star pattern covering the surface and a brass mimi or rim.  The kozuka comes complete with kogatana. The kogatana polish is diminished but you can still the the hamon. The kozuka is shibuichi with a large ebi or shrimp applied to it's surface which is gold plated.

 

SOLD

 

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